TWEAKING ENGLEWOOD’S FARMERS MARKETS

County could require subtracting arts vendors, adding more food
By STEVE REILLY – STAFF WRITER

ENGLEWOOD — Sarasota County is seeking a new balance for Englewood’s farmers markets.

County commissioners will consider changing a county ordinance that will limit the number of arts and crafts, jewelry, health and health services, and other non-food vendors to only 25 percent of the total number of vendors. The discussion is set for Nov. 6.

If the ordinance is changed, 75 percent of the remaining vendors must sell vegetables, honey and cheeses, spices, coffees or any other food product, including artisan and prepared foods. The county ordinance now allows a 50-50 split to the products sold at farmers markets.

Farmers markets are held along West Dearborn Street on Thursdays from October to May.

The nonprofit Englewood Farmer’s Market was the first in Englewood, opening eight years ago at the Pioneer Plaza on the 300 block of West Dearborn. Joyce Colmar opened her for-profit Dearborn Street Market across the street. Since then other smaller markets have been sprouting up along and around West Dearborn.

Englewood’s Community Redevelopment Agency staff has been meeting with market managers in an ongoing discussion to devise a reasonable formula and methodology for determining enforcement. The call for the modification of the farmers markets, CRA manager Debbie Marks said, came from various brickand- mortar Dearborn merchants who felt that the arts and other non-produce vendors undermined their businesses last year.

To define the ratio of vendors at the markets, the managers and CRA discussed Tuesday how a 10-by-10-foot space could equate to one unit of vendor’s space.

“I have vendors who are paying for five booths,” Colmar said.

Will that affect the ratio of food to non-food vendors?

And how will county code enforcement determine who is or isn’t in compliance, Englewood Farmer’s Market manager Lee Perron asked.

“It’s a math thing.

Zeros and ones. Either it is or isn’t (in compliance),” Perron said.

Marks suggested a county official could visit a particular market and determine whether the market is meeting the guidelines at the outset of the season. Reporting any subsequent changes would be the responsibility of the managers, she said.

“We need to support our locals first and foremost,” DonnaMarie Lee said.

Lee manages a small farmers market Thursdays, but she also is co-owner of Bobarino’s Pizzeria on Magnolia Avenue at West Dearborn.

“We need to focus on our town first, community first,” she said.

“Then we can bring in the extras.”

Email: reilly@sun-herald.com

Other Market
Like the other markets on West Dearborn Street Thursday, Joyce Colmar’s Dearborn Street Market saw a large crowd on its opening day.

Jimmy Java
Autumn Glick prepares a cup of Cape Coral-based coffee roaster Jimmy Java’s cold-brew coffee at one of the various farmers markets on West Dearborn Street. It’s Jimmy Java’s first time in Englewood and Glick said Jimmy’s Java will return.

SUN PHOTOS BY STEVE REILLY

ENGLEWOOD FARMERS MARKET BIG SEASON OPENING

By STEVE REILLY – STAFF WRITER

ENGLEWOOD — Autumn Glick was impressed with “the magnitude of the various vendors” at the farmer’s markets on West Dearborn Street Thursday.

“And it’s a nice crowd,” said Glick, who served coffee for the Cape Coralbased coffee roaster Jimmy’s Java which travels to various farmer’s markets. Thursday was Jimmy Java’s first day in Englewood, the largest and most diverse of the farmer’s markets they’ve attended.

Expect Jimmy Java to be back next Thursday, Glick said.

The nonprofit Englewood Farmer’s Market Manager Lee Perron suspected Thursday morning the market’s opening day may have been its biggest. He was right. More than 3,200 people strolled through the market Thursday, a record for an opening day, he said.

The nonprofit market was the first in Englewood and opened eight years ago at the Pioneer Plaza on the 300 block of West Dearborn. Since then, it led to other similar markets to spring up around it, including Joyce Colmar’s for-profit Dearborn Street Market across the street from the nonprofit market.

Prior to the opening day for the farmer’s market, which is open 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. every Thursday, Perron said he heard “a buzz around town” looking forward to its reopening. The market is also filled to capacity with 58 vendors — and that doesn’t count the numerous vendors at Colmar’s or the other smaller markets.

Chef Ef Martinez, who owned several restaurants in New York City before moving to Venice, prepared paella at the farmer’s market and sold “Cordon Oro, all-purpose seasoning.” It’s his third year at the market. Like Perron, Martinez thought the market saw a goodsized opening crowd Thursday.

Les Bernstein, a Olde Englewood Village Association board member, said the farmer’s markets attracted a “good crowd.” He also noticed new vendors selling their wares on Dearborn Thursday.

Bernstein owns the brick-and-mortar Rehab on Dearborn, vintage and collectibles shop just west of the farmer’s market. He could not say whether all the merchants benefit from the farmer’s markets, but he did know the markets bring additional foot traffic up and down West Dearborn.

Email: reilly@sun-herald.com

jimmy java
Autumn Glick prepares a cup of Cape Coral-based coffee roaster Jimmy Java’s cold-brew coffee at the one of the various farmer’s markets on West Dearborn Street Thursday. It’s Jimmy Java’s first time in Englewood and Glick said Jimmy’s Java will be back next Thursday.

Other Market
Like the other markets on West Dearborn Street Thursday, Joyce Colmar’s Dearborn Street Market saw a large crowd on its opening day.

photos by Steve Reilly

FARMERS HEADING TO ENGLEWOOD

By STEVE REILLY (Englewood Sun staff writer)

ENGLEWOOD — The temperature and humidity may still signal summer, but a sure sign of the fall season will be on West Dearborn Street in nine days.

“The Englewood Famer’s Market is set to launch its new season,” said Lee Perron, who manages both the Englewood and Venice farmers markets. The market will be held from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. Thursdays, beginning Oct. 4, at Pioneer Plaza, 300 W. Dearborn St., Englewood.

This week, Perron and three helpers spread 100 cubic yards of mulch — a 60-foot-long semi-trailer plus two dump truck loads — to mark out the pathways between vendors at the Pioneer Plaza, Perron said.

Joyce Colmar, owner of the property across from the plaza, is expected to bring back her Dearborn Street Market of assorted vendors as well. Colmar could not be reached for comment.

The Englewood Farmer’s Market is the second-largest in Charlotte, Sarasota and Manatee counties. The downtown Sarasota Farmers Market is the largest in any of the three counties.

The Venice Farmers Market operates year-round, 8 a.m. to noon Saturdays. It’s located at the Venice City Hall on the 400 block of West Venice Avenue and the Avenue Des Parques.

Englewood’s is at 300 W. Dearborn St., the heart of Olde Englewood Village.

Why go to a farmers market? On the Englewood Farmer’s Market Facebook page, Perron wrote: “You can shop for local and organic fresh Florida produce directly from local farmers, find wild-caught Florida seafood from local fishermen, select from seven gourmet bakers including gluten-free, taste and sample international artisan food creations, discover the amazing selection of flowers, plants and trees from our green space vendors, and of course enjoy the music and ambiance of a true food and agricultural market experience.”

Ivani Norman of Myakka City sells vegan organic homemade cowboy cookies and breads at the Englewood Farmer’s Market in 2017.

SUN FILE PHOTO BY ELAINE ALLEN-EMRICH

Efrain Martinez of Al Anadaluz packs up a tin of paella during the Englewood Farmer’s Market in 2017.

SUN FILE PHOTO BY ALEXANDRA HERRERA

It also supports local growers — there will be 11 this year — and supports SNAP and the Fresh Access Bucks double dollars program for customers who qualify for that federal assistance.

The market is also good for West Dearborn Street and Englewood’s traditional downtown.

“(The farmers market) brings lots of people to Dearborn,” said TaylorMeals, president of the Olde Englewood Village Association. Besides being a big draw in itself, Meals said, the farmers market draws potentially new customers into Dearborn’s restaurants and shops.

In November 2011, the outset of Englewood Farmer’s Market saw 17 vendors and 21 booths, attracting 1,500 people on its opening day. By the end of the season, the market grew to 43 vendors and 50 booths, attracting 70,000 people by the end of the inaugural season.

Subsequently, the Englewood market grew annually, attracting an even larger crop of vendors and booths. From the fall of last year until this spring, the market’s 60 vendors served 165,000 attendees, a 8 percent increase over the previous year.

Venice’s farmers market sees 50 vendors participating at the farmer markets on Saturdays, with 5,000 people showing up during season. The Venice market started operating as a nonprofit last year. The market now expects to see 8,000 people per week during the winter season.

As a nonprofit under the tax-exempt Friends of Sarasota County Parks, the Englewood Farmers Market has contributed $84,000 to local charities and other nonprofits since 2011. Beneficiaries include the food banks at St. David’s Jubilee Center and Englewood Helping Hand, The Englewood Community Care Clinic, New Paradigm, Friends of Sarasota County Parks and Englewood Elementary School.

The Venice Farmers Market intends to donate $17,000 by the end of 2018.

Email: reilly@sun-herald.com

Lee Perron is getting ready to open up the 2018-2019 Englewood Farmer’s Market on Englewood’s West Dearborn Street.

Joy and Peace on Earth from the EFM

I would like to take a moment and thank each and every one of you for all your support and assistance in making the Englewood Farmers Market the best market in the tri-county area! We are truly unique in both our qualitative focus on food and agriculture and giving back to the community we serve. Your level of professionalism and talent has set the benchmark for a very successful future.

This is also the time of year that we should pause to reflect on the goodness that life has brought us this past year, even in the face of adversity on occasion.

It is our sincere hope that this holiday season and the year to come bring joy, laughter, and much success to you and your families!

Merry Christmas and Happy Holidays!

From the EFM team with much love,

Amy, Bob, Lee, Marie, Mike, Ricardo, Rose & Tom

@ THE Englewood Farmers Market