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Englewood farmers market no more

Construction displaced it; no alternate location found

By STEVE REILLY

STAFF WRITER

ENGLEWOOD ? After a decade attracting thousands to West Dearborn Street for fresh fruits and vegetables, fresh baked bread and steaming tins of paella, the Englewood Farmers Market is no more.

Lee Perron, manager of the nonprofit since its inception, made the announcement Monday.

“It has taken many hours of discussion and difficult consideration before coming to this decision,” Perron told the Englewood Community Redevelopment Advisory Board during its meeting Monday afternoon at Lemon Bay Park.

“In many ways, this is just the time for the final chapter of a great

story,” Perron said. “Who knew that

shoppers at the Englewood Farmers Market

The nonprofit Englewood Farmers Market had been a staple on West Dearborn Street every Thursday from October until the end of May. Market manager Lee Perron announced Monday that it will not return this fall. Other markets are expected along Dearborn ? but that, too, remains to be seen. SUN FILE PHOTO

during the last 10 years, that over 1 million people would come to historic downtown Englewood on Thursdays between October and May?”

The farmers market vendors set up their stands Thursdays, starting early on October Thurdays and fall and sticking around until crowds grew sparce in May. It’s home has been the Pioneer Plaza between West Dearborn and Green streets on the 300 block. The market attracted thousands to West Dearborn each year.

But for the upcoming season, the farmers market needed to find an alternate site while Sarasota County builds a permanent stage, band shell, sidewalks and restrooms in the plaza.

No suitable location could be found, Perron said, and the market’s board decided to end the Englewood market. The nonprofit farmers market operated under the umbrella of the Friends of Sarasota County Parks.

Its demise will not affect the Venice and North Port farmers markets, which Perron also manages.

The success of the Englewood nonprofit market led to other farmers markets to spring up Thursdays on private property along West Dearborn Street. The largest was Joyce Colmar’s Dearborn Street Market on her property across the street from the Pioneer Plaza.

Colmar could not be reached Monday for comment.

Even though he announced the end of the Englewood Farmers Market, Perron said, “We have already made plans, in addition to the $7,000 in donations we just issued in July, to donate the entire remainder of our financial assets in the amount of $9,700 and all of our tangible assets and operating materials to nonprofit entities.

“This should be completed no later than the end of September 2021,” he said.

Meanwhile, Perron will be notifying his vendors so they can find other venues to sell their wares. Email: steve.reilly@yoursun.com

Englewood Farmers Market to Cancel Upcoming Season

EFM Logo

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE: Englewood Farmers Market to Cancel Upcoming Season

Contact: info@englewoodfarmersmarket.org

Due to the construction project for the farmers market site which will begin in August, and is expected to take approximately six months to complete, the Englewood Farmers Market will cancel the Fall 2021 – Spring 2022 season. With less than two months before our projected opening, our Board of Directors has regretfully voted to dissolve the Englewood Farmers Market and cease all operations.
“Unfortunately, two alternate location options that we may have considered are no longer available to us. In addition, two other suggested options in the downtown area do not have sufficient linear footage for the vendor tents or a large enough square-footage footprint for pedestrian traffic and vendor vehicular and trailer parking. None of the alternate sites we have considered have the necessary infrastructure such as electricity, restrooms, or potable water, that are required to support our market operations and the significant seasonal attendance volume of approximately 200,000 customers. It has taken many hours of discussion and difficult consideration by the EFM Board of Directors before coming to this decision.”
“Our customers will be notified via social media, along with e-mail and voicemail. All of our Englewood community SNAP customers will be able to continue using their benefits and any remaining tokens at our Venice Farmers Market which is open on Saturday mornings year around.”
It is important to note that during the last ten years that over one million people have come to historic downtown Englewood on Thursdays between October and May… that the University of Florida’s economic impact study presented to the CRA a report that the market was a multi-million dollar enterprise benefitting the vendors and downtown merchants and that the market had become the economic engine contributing to the renaissance of the downtown business district… and that the market, as a non-profit entity under the Friends of Sarasota County Parks, has donated over $235,000 dollars back to the Helping Hand and St. David’s food banks, the Englewood Care Clinic, local parks, and funds to address food insecurity in our community through the Fresh Access Bucks/Feeding Florida SNAP program.
“I would like to publicly thank our market founders, Marie LaForge, Mike Hutchinson, Ricardo Ruggiero, and Don Musilli… and to also thank our Board Treasurer, Rose Hutchinson…. A special thank you to former Elsie Quick Library Manager, Jennifer Perry and to our Operations Staff Amy Stone, Bob Deal and Tom Stone.
But most of all we would like to thank, from the bottom of our hearts, the Englewood community. The EFM was your market. You built it, supported it, loved it and made it your own. We simply had the pleasure to operate and nurture the market’s growth on your behalf over the last decade. We are humbled…and we leave you with our most sincere attitude of gratitude.
We have already made plans, in addition to the $7,000 in donations we just issued in July, to donate the entire remainder of our financial assets in the amount of $9,700 and all of our tangible assets and operating materials to non-profit entities. This should be completed no later than the end of September, 2021.
We feel that we have completed our mission, and we are amazed that the market has exceeded even our own wildest expectations. Even during this last pandemic year of a season of winter, it has been a place of excitement, positive energy, joy and much love! And we wish for all of you, who work and play in historic downtown Englewood, our best wishes for great success in the years to come.

Thank you!

Best of Englewood 2021

2021 Best of Englewood

Best of SRQ Local 2021 Bronze Winner

Englewood Farmers Market - Best of SRQ Market Bronze Winner 2021

We’ve been nominated… Vote us the best market in Englewood !!

Vote us best market in Englewood!

JUST CLICK ON THE IMAGE TO TAKE YOU TO THE VOTING WEBSITE!

Why we love our Market… Video!


See why the Englewood Farmers Market is so important to our community. Click on the image to start the video.

Thank you Englewood, you voted us #1

Best of Englewood Award 2020

The EFM receives the Tripadvisor Travelers Choice 2020 Award

We are  honored to receive this Travelers Choice Award!
Thank you to all who come our market and support our vendors.

We are excited to see you all October 1st!

Tripadvisor Travelers Choice 2020

EFM CDC COMPLIANT OPERATIONAL GUIDELINES FAQ’s

  • August 24, 2020
  • FAQs

 

How does EFM plan to practice social distancing?

Vendor booths will be spaced at a minimum of six (6) feet apart from one another.

EFM will set-up caution tape where necessary in between booths to discourage customers from walking in between booths or into traffic.

Booth set-up minimizes a customer’s ability to touch products (ropes, tables, cones, sneeze guards). Customers may self-select produce when wearing a mask while following the rules of social distancing, “shop with your eyes not hands”, and “take what you touch”.

Vendor booths will have markers for 6 feet of social distancing for customers that walk up and are in line.

Vendors will have a “Pick Up Table” or use existing counter space for placing product for pick-up and receiving payment separate from product display.

Customers will be instructed to walk directionally and shop on the right at vendor tents and walk through the market in the center of the pedestrian walkway

There will not be dining, seating or gathering areas within the market site.

EFM staff will constantly be monitoring the market site traffic and encouraging customers to keep moving to avoid overcrowding.

When market site attendance approaches crowds that inhibit effective social distancing, VFM staff will have a click-counter tool to track and control the number of people (entering and exiting) in the market. Staff will communicate via 2-way radios at market entrances/exits as customers enter and exit.

EFM will place signage around the perimeter of the market between the street and sidewalks directing customers to use entrances at W. Dearborn St. and Green St. only.  

Ask customers to please conclude shopping the market if they are shopping for an extended period (more than 30 minutes).

In preparation of lines forming with walk-up customers, VFM will have 6-foot pavement markers outside of both entrances of the market. EFM to display instructional signs “Line Forms Here” and “maintain 6 feet for social distancing”.

Customer Code of Conduct signs posted at each entrance to the market site.

Customer friendly signage displayed throughout the market as reminders.

Will there be handwashing/sanitizing stations?

Yes, Vendors are required to have their own hand sanitization station. For customers, EFM will have handwashing/sanitizing stations at each entrance to the market located at W. Dearborn St. and Green St.

EFM will check every 30 minutes that there is adequate soap and paper towels and/or sanitizer at all EFM handwashing/sanitization stations and refill as necessary. All hand washing/sanitization stations will meet health guidelines.  EFM will provide hand sanitizer for customers, vendors and staff at each entrance, our info booth and the exit.

Can I bring my dog to the market?

Please keep your pets at home (unless service animal).

What sanitation procedures are in place?

Staff and Vendors will clean and disinfect all “high-touch” surfaces including tabletops, phones, keyboards, and cash register counters (at minimum every 30 minutes).

Will there be restrooms for the public? 

There will be restrooms located at the southwest area of the plaza.

Will vendors be practicing new safety guidelines? 

Yes, here is a list of new procedures our vendors will follow to ensure health safety:

The selection of vendors will be consistent with existing Vendor Handbook located on the EFM website @ www.englewoodfarmersmaket.org 

Except for produce and agricultural products, all food and bakery items will be packaged prior to customer purchase.  Non-food items will be packaged, wrapped or bagged.

Vendors are required to wear PPE, facemasks and gloves at all times.

Vendors and staff are required to self-evaluate their health status prior to coming to market. This includes not coming to work sick and/or exhibiting COVID 19 symptoms.

Vendors and staff are required to report if they have had contact with anyone who has tested positive with COVID 19 and to request a two-week absence to self-quarantine. 

Vendor booths will have markers for 6 feet of social distancing, provided by vendors, for customers that walk up and are in line.

Vendors will have a “Pick Up Table” or use existing counter space to place orders for pick up.

Encourage the use of on-line order and prepayment, credit/debit cards and contactless payment. If cash is used, we ask that vendors round up to the nearest dollar to limit the need for change.

SNAP customers will place their payment tokens in separate plastic bags provided by VFM staff when making payment to vendors. EFM staff will collect the bags at the end of market. Tokens will be sanitized prior to re-issue.

Vendors should encourage customers to use credit/debit cards. Credit cards, clipboards, and terminals shall be sanitized after each transaction.

Handling money/market currency and food handling are separate (I.e.: there is one staff member handling food and another staff member that is handling money… adjoining vendors may share staff to handle money). 

Only the necessary staff are working

No sampling, no selling consume-on-premises food and no refilling reusable containers.

Vendors wash their hands, change their gloves and sanitize their counters, tables, and work space frequently.

Vendors must handle produce (except where customer is wearing a mask and follows the customer code of conduct rules) and product for shoppers.

All booths have a hand sanitizer with 60% alcohol.

Vendors must use plastic or vinyl tables and/or coverings for easy sanitizing.

Vendors must wash hands after using the restroom, touching their face, sneezing, using a tissue, before and after eating, and after handling money.

VFM staff will perform periodic checks of all vendors’ booths each hour. Any vendor that does not follow their pre-approved set-up will be required to stop selling and immediately correct the issue.

During the periodic checks, if staff observes possible COVID 19 symptoms among vendors or staff, vendor and/or staff temperature will be taken with a contactless thermometer.

Before a vendor can sell, EFM staff will review each vendor booth for proper social distancing setup.

Vendors must clean and disinfect all “high-touch” surfaces every 30 minutes, such as (but not limited to) tabletops, phones, keyboards, cash register counters, handwashing sinks, card readers; and trash cans frequently. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA)-registered products that clean (removes germs) and disinfect (kill germs) must be used.

For Proper Handling of Disinfectants and Waste, vendors must ensure that:

Chemicals are used in a well-ventilated area and not mixed with incompatible chemicals

No chemical contact with food during cleaning

Waste is disposed safely a in a secure trash container provided by the vendor

Customer Code of Conduct

STAY HOME if I am sick or if I have been in contact with someone who is sick.

Make a shopping list before visiting the market.

Pre-order and prepay vendors if possible @ www.englewoodfarmersmarket.org 

Designate one shopper per household.

Leave my pet at home unless it is a service dog.

Be alert! I will notice modifications and signs and adhere to them.

Not touch products, but instead, ask a vendor for what I would like.

Maintain 6 feet of space at all times. I will look for physical cues like tape, chalk, and signs to help remind me.

Shop quickly and efficiently – 30 minutes or less

Use the provided hand sanitizer and/or hand wash stations at the market.

Avoid touching my eyes, nose, mouth, and face in general.

Cover my cough or sneeze with a tissue, then dispose of it. Then wash my hands.

Wear a face mask if you have one available, necessary for hand selecting produce, “shop with your eyes not your hands”, “take what you touch”

Be the most responsible shopper I can possibly be!

Take a photo of this sign as your reminder!

Venice Farmers Market to Re-Open on July 11, 2020!

we are back!

Summer vendors will offer produce, fresh baked goods including breads, pies, bagels and pretzels, wild-caught seafood, Florida-grown mushrooms, boutique cheeses, locally roasted coffee, kettle corn, hand-crafted soap, essential oils, nursery plants and fresh-cut flowers. In addition, local artists will be attending the market offering award-winning photography, unique clay art and jewelry, hand-designed clothing for children and adults, and more.

Market staff and vendors have created a CDC-compliant and safe socially distanced outdoor shopping experience for the community, states Farmers Market Manager Lee Perron. All staff and vendors will wear masks and gloves and sanitizing stations will be available. The plan has been reviewed and approved by the City of Venice in order to comply with all federal, state and local guidelines for food and personal safety. Please visit the market website, www.thevenicefarmersmarket.org, and select the FAQ tab to read more about new operating guidelines.

During the construction of Fire Station 1 and expansion of City Hall, the market will relocate out of the parking lot but will still operate at City Hall. The Farmers Market will set up on W. Venice Avenue between Harbor Drive and Avenue des Parques, located between City Hall and the Hecksher Park tennis courts.

Summer market hours will be from 8 a.m. to noon. Only service animals will be allowed during current COVID-19 rules.

For more information, go to www.thevenicefarmersmarket.org. Contact Lee Perron via email at info@thevenicefarmersmarket.org or call 941-445-9209.

Local farmers markets suspended, vendors available

Strawberries phot

Farmers markets are closed in the area until further notice. You can still get items like fresh strawberries from vendors, by going to the farmers markets’ Facebook pages. SUN PHOTO BY OLIVIA CAMERON

ENGLEWOOD — As might be expected in the midst of the coronavirus pandemic, farmers markets are suspended.
Englewood and Venice markets aren’t happening, organizers announced Tuesday.
The Punta Gorda Farmers Market has also been suspended, but organizers anticipate reopening the market next month.
“Our markets will remain closed until further notice in compliance with federal, state and local guidelines,” manager Lee Perron announced in an email Tuesday.
Perron manages the markets in Englewood, Venice and the new market that started this year at CoolToday Park in North Port, spring training home of the Atlanta Braves. That market was canceled earlier this month after Major League Baseball shut down spring training.
“The phone volume and e-mails regarding our markets have been massive,” Perron said.
But that doesn’t mean people have to deprive themselves of fresh vegetables. Patrons may still contact their favorite vendors individually and make their own arrangements.
“We are also directing customers in a responsible way to use our vendor directory on our websites to contact vendors directly,” Perron said. People need to arrange their own delivery and/or pick up options that comply with current social contact guidance.”
Perron encouraged vendors to use the markets’ Facebook pages as a platform to sell their products.
The vendor directories can be found on www.englewoodfarmersmarket.org or www.thevenicefarmersmarket.org.
“Flexibility, patience and kindness will allow us all to work through our current global crisis,” Perron said. ‘Be well and be safe.”

The Market will be moving to a new location on next Thursday, March 19

Until further notice the Englewood Farmers Market will be relocating to the 500 block of Dearborn Street on Garrett Park, towards the Veteran’s Memorial.

The Englewood Farmers Market is moving!

   500 W. Dearborn St., Englewood FL 34223

                                  New location: 500 W. Dearborn St., Englewood FL 34223

The Englewood Farmers Market is closed for Thanksgiving

Englewood Farmers Market Closed for Thanksgiving

The Englewood Farmers Market will be closed Nov. 28 for Thanksgiving

Happy Thanksgiving!!!

 

 

Englewood’s farmers market opens to crowds

By STEVE REILL (Englewood Sun – STAFF WRITER)

A sure sign that autumn has arrived in Englewood is its Thursday farmers market.

Lee Perron, manager for the nonprofit Englewood, Venice and new North Port markets, anticipated 2,000 to 2,500 shoppers to visit vendors by the 2 p.m. closing time Thursday.

“That’s a good opening,” Perron said. Wednesday, opening day the North Port farmers market — located at CoolToday Park, the Atlanta Braves Spring Training facility, 18800 South West Villages Parkway — saw 2,000 to 2,500 people turn out.

In November 2011, the first day of the Englewood Farmer’s Market saw 17 vendors, 21 booths and attracted 1,500 people. Now there’s more than 56 vendors at the market — and that doesn’t count the markets that sprung up around Englewood’s downtown and are piggybacking on the success of the original nonprofit market.

“We’ve heard nothing bad about Englewood,” said Anthony Sessa of the Fort Myers-based The Pasta Machine, a new vendor at the Englewood Farmers Market.

For Stevie Banks, the drive from North Port was worth it.

“There’s so many different (vendors),” she said.

Rosibel Malheiro sells jewelry and women’s wear at one of the smaller markets at the corner of South Orange Avenue and West Dearborn Street. She’s been coming Thursdays from Sarasota to the Englewood markets for several years.

“I like the people — and it’s quiet,” Malheiro said. Email: steve.reilly@yoursun.com

Hernandez Produce

The Plant City-based Hernandez Farm Produce owners Lucia Hernandez and her husband, Artemio, never miss selling their produce at the annual Englewood Farmers Market every Thursday until May. (SUN PHOTO BY STEVE REILLY)

Englewood Farmers Market ready to sprout new season

By STEVE REILLY, Staff Writer, The Englewood Sun

ENGLEWOOD — Even Lee Perron never imagined the Englewood Farmers Market would be as successful as it is.

“I’ve been really busy,” Perron said Friday. Not surprising.

The Englewood market will be back 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. beginning Oct. 3 and every Thursday after that until May on the 300 block of West Dearborn Street at the Pioneer Plaza.

In 2011, Perron imagined it to become a small community market on West Dearborn Street with local growers and vendors selling fresh produce and other commodities. According to Sun reports, in November 2011, the opening day of the Englewood Farmer’s Market saw 17vendors, 21 booths and attracted 1,500 people.

Now, Perron, the manager of the nonprofit market, said more than 80 vendors are on a waiting list and the market attracted 8,000 or more people regularly last year. The Englewood Farmers Market now is also attracting the interest of growers from Florida’s East Coast and elsewhere in the state, something Perron never expected.

This year, the market will see 56 vendors with four new “rock stars” — a French baker, cut flower and professional floral arranger, fresh pasta maker and an “old country” Greek yogurt maker, Perron said.

The success of the Englewood Farmers Market even impressed Atlanta Braves representatives who asked Perron to start up and manage a similar nonprofit market. The seasonal West Villages Market will operate Wednesdays from October through March, at the Atlanta Braves Spring Training Facility, 18800 S. West Villages Parkway.

Many of the same vendors intend to sell their wares at both the West Villages and Englewood markets. Perron does not see the two markets competing with each other, but rather, they will complement each other. He also manages the nonprofit farmers market Saturday mornings at the Venice City Hall.

Citing the growth in West Villages and North Port that the Villages Farmers Market could serve, Perron suggested the Englewood market shouldn’tlose customers nor vendors, but will level out to what can be handled and provide positive experiences for both customers and vendors.

Jessica McDowell, of Rhoads Produce in Englewood

Jessica McDowell, of Rhoads Produce in Englewood, stands by near the many produce on sale at last year’s Englewood Farmers Market. Organizers are getting ready to reopen Oct. 3 at 300 W. Dearborn St.

The success of the Englewood Farmers Market can be measured by how it helps others.

As a nonprofit under the tax-exempt status of the Friends of Sarasota County Parks, the Englewood Farmers Market contributed more than $84,000 to local charities and other nonprofits from 2011 to 2018. Beneficiaries include the food banks at St. David’s Jubilee Center and Englewood Helping Hand, The Englewood Community Care Clinic, New Paradigm, Friends of Sarasota County Parks and Englewood Elementary School. Email: Steve.Reilly@yoursun.com

Lee Peron, Market Manager

Lee Perron is manager of the Englewood Farmer’s Market on Englewood’s West Dearborn Street. He’s ready to reopen the weekly market on Oct. 3.

TWEAKING ENGLEWOOD’S FARMERS MARKETS

County could require subtracting arts vendors, adding more food
By STEVE REILLY – STAFF WRITER

ENGLEWOOD — Sarasota County is seeking a new balance for Englewood’s farmers markets.

County commissioners will consider changing a county ordinance that will limit the number of arts and crafts, jewelry, health and health services, and other non-food vendors to only 25 percent of the total number of vendors. The discussion is set for Nov. 6.

If the ordinance is changed, 75 percent of the remaining vendors must sell vegetables, honey and cheeses, spices, coffees or any other food product, including artisan and prepared foods. The county ordinance now allows a 50-50 split to the products sold at farmers markets.

Farmers markets are held along West Dearborn Street on Thursdays from October to May.

The nonprofit Englewood Farmer’s Market was the first in Englewood, opening eight years ago at the Pioneer Plaza on the 300 block of West Dearborn. Joyce Colmar opened her for-profit Dearborn Street Market across the street. Since then other smaller markets have been sprouting up along and around West Dearborn.

Englewood’s Community Redevelopment Agency staff has been meeting with market managers in an ongoing discussion to devise a reasonable formula and methodology for determining enforcement. The call for the modification of the farmers markets, CRA manager Debbie Marks said, came from various brickand- mortar Dearborn merchants who felt that the arts and other non-produce vendors undermined their businesses last year.

To define the ratio of vendors at the markets, the managers and CRA discussed Tuesday how a 10-by-10-foot space could equate to one unit of vendor’s space.

“I have vendors who are paying for five booths,” Colmar said.

Will that affect the ratio of food to non-food vendors?

And how will county code enforcement determine who is or isn’t in compliance, Englewood Farmer’s Market manager Lee Perron asked.

“It’s a math thing.

Zeros and ones. Either it is or isn’t (in compliance),” Perron said.

Marks suggested a county official could visit a particular market and determine whether the market is meeting the guidelines at the outset of the season. Reporting any subsequent changes would be the responsibility of the managers, she said.

“We need to support our locals first and foremost,” DonnaMarie Lee said.

Lee manages a small farmers market Thursdays, but she also is co-owner of Bobarino’s Pizzeria on Magnolia Avenue at West Dearborn.

“We need to focus on our town first, community first,” she said.

“Then we can bring in the extras.”

Email: reilly@sun-herald.com

Other Market

Like the other markets on West Dearborn Street Thursday, Joyce Colmar’s Dearborn Street Market saw a large crowd on its opening day.

Jimmy Java

Autumn Glick prepares a cup of Cape Coral-based coffee roaster Jimmy Java’s cold-brew coffee at one of the various farmers markets on West Dearborn Street. It’s Jimmy Java’s first time in Englewood and Glick said Jimmy’s Java will return.

SUN PHOTOS BY STEVE REILLY

ENGLEWOOD FARMERS MARKET BIG SEASON OPENING

By STEVE REILLY – STAFF WRITER

ENGLEWOOD — Autumn Glick was impressed with “the magnitude of the various vendors” at the farmer’s markets on West Dearborn Street Thursday.

“And it’s a nice crowd,” said Glick, who served coffee for the Cape Coralbased coffee roaster Jimmy’s Java which travels to various farmer’s markets. Thursday was Jimmy Java’s first day in Englewood, the largest and most diverse of the farmer’s markets they’ve attended.

Expect Jimmy Java to be back next Thursday, Glick said.

The nonprofit Englewood Farmer’s Market Manager Lee Perron suspected Thursday morning the market’s opening day may have been its biggest. He was right. More than 3,200 people strolled through the market Thursday, a record for an opening day, he said.

The nonprofit market was the first in Englewood and opened eight years ago at the Pioneer Plaza on the 300 block of West Dearborn. Since then, it led to other similar markets to spring up around it, including Joyce Colmar’s for-profit Dearborn Street Market across the street from the nonprofit market.

Prior to the opening day for the farmer’s market, which is open 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. every Thursday, Perron said he heard “a buzz around town” looking forward to its reopening. The market is also filled to capacity with 58 vendors — and that doesn’t count the numerous vendors at Colmar’s or the other smaller markets.

Chef Ef Martinez, who owned several restaurants in New York City before moving to Venice, prepared paella at the farmer’s market and sold “Cordon Oro, all-purpose seasoning.” It’s his third year at the market. Like Perron, Martinez thought the market saw a goodsized opening crowd Thursday.

Les Bernstein, a Olde Englewood Village Association board member, said the farmer’s markets attracted a “good crowd.” He also noticed new vendors selling their wares on Dearborn Thursday.

Bernstein owns the brick-and-mortar Rehab on Dearborn, vintage and collectibles shop just west of the farmer’s market. He could not say whether all the merchants benefit from the farmer’s markets, but he did know the markets bring additional foot traffic up and down West Dearborn.

Email: reilly@sun-herald.com

jimmy java

Autumn Glick prepares a cup of Cape Coral-based coffee roaster Jimmy Java’s cold-brew coffee at the one of the various farmer’s markets on West Dearborn Street Thursday. It’s Jimmy Java’s first time in Englewood and Glick said Jimmy’s Java will be back next Thursday.

Other Market

Like the other markets on West Dearborn Street Thursday, Joyce Colmar’s Dearborn Street Market saw a large crowd on its opening day.

photos by Steve Reilly

FARMERS HEADING TO ENGLEWOOD

By STEVE REILLY (Englewood Sun staff writer)

ENGLEWOOD — The temperature and humidity may still signal summer, but a sure sign of the fall season will be on West Dearborn Street in nine days.

“The Englewood Famer’s Market is set to launch its new season,” said Lee Perron, who manages both the Englewood and Venice farmers markets. The market will be held from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. Thursdays, beginning Oct. 4, at Pioneer Plaza, 300 W. Dearborn St., Englewood.

This week, Perron and three helpers spread 100 cubic yards of mulch — a 60-foot-long semi-trailer plus two dump truck loads — to mark out the pathways between vendors at the Pioneer Plaza, Perron said.

Joyce Colmar, owner of the property across from the plaza, is expected to bring back her Dearborn Street Market of assorted vendors as well. Colmar could not be reached for comment.

The Englewood Farmer’s Market is the second-largest in Charlotte, Sarasota and Manatee counties. The downtown Sarasota Farmers Market is the largest in any of the three counties.

The Venice Farmers Market operates year-round, 8 a.m. to noon Saturdays. It’s located at the Venice City Hall on the 400 block of West Venice Avenue and the Avenue Des Parques.

Englewood’s is at 300 W. Dearborn St., the heart of Olde Englewood Village.

Why go to a farmers market? On the Englewood Farmer’s Market Facebook page, Perron wrote: “You can shop for local and organic fresh Florida produce directly from local farmers, find wild-caught Florida seafood from local fishermen, select from seven gourmet bakers including gluten-free, taste and sample international artisan food creations, discover the amazing selection of flowers, plants and trees from our green space vendors, and of course enjoy the music and ambiance of a true food and agricultural market experience.”

Ivani Norman of Myakka City sells vegan organic homemade cowboy cookies and breads at the Englewood Farmer’s Market in 2017.

SUN FILE PHOTO BY ELAINE ALLEN-EMRICH

Efrain Martinez of Al Anadaluz packs up a tin of paella during the Englewood Farmer’s Market in 2017.

SUN FILE PHOTO BY ALEXANDRA HERRERA

It also supports local growers — there will be 11 this year — and supports SNAP and the Fresh Access Bucks double dollars program for customers who qualify for that federal assistance.

The market is also good for West Dearborn Street and Englewood’s traditional downtown.

“(The farmers market) brings lots of people to Dearborn,” said TaylorMeals, president of the Olde Englewood Village Association. Besides being a big draw in itself, Meals said, the farmers market draws potentially new customers into Dearborn’s restaurants and shops.

In November 2011, the outset of Englewood Farmer’s Market saw 17 vendors and 21 booths, attracting 1,500 people on its opening day. By the end of the season, the market grew to 43 vendors and 50 booths, attracting 70,000 people by the end of the inaugural season.

Subsequently, the Englewood market grew annually, attracting an even larger crop of vendors and booths. From the fall of last year until this spring, the market’s 60 vendors served 165,000 attendees, a 8 percent increase over the previous year.

Venice’s farmers market sees 50 vendors participating at the farmer markets on Saturdays, with 5,000 people showing up during season. The Venice market started operating as a nonprofit last year. The market now expects to see 8,000 people per week during the winter season.

As a nonprofit under the tax-exempt Friends of Sarasota County Parks, the Englewood Farmers Market has contributed $84,000 to local charities and other nonprofits since 2011. Beneficiaries include the food banks at St. David’s Jubilee Center and Englewood Helping Hand, The Englewood Community Care Clinic, New Paradigm, Friends of Sarasota County Parks and Englewood Elementary School.

The Venice Farmers Market intends to donate $17,000 by the end of 2018.

Email: reilly@sun-herald.com

Lee Perron is getting ready to open up the 2018-2019 Englewood Farmer’s Market on Englewood’s West Dearborn Street.

Now That’s Fresh!

  • February 11, 2018
  • Press

Joy and Peace on Earth from the EFM

I would like to take a moment and thank each and every one of you for all your support and assistance in making the Englewood Farmers Market the best market in the tri-county area! We are truly unique in both our qualitative focus on food and agriculture and giving back to the community we serve. Your level of professionalism and talent has set the benchmark for a very successful future.

This is also the time of year that we should pause to reflect on the goodness that life has brought us this past year, even in the face of adversity on occasion.

It is our sincere hope that this holiday season and the year to come bring joy, laughter, and much success to you and your families!

Merry Christmas and Happy Holidays!

From the EFM team with much love,

Amy, Bob, Lee, Marie, Mike, Ricardo, Rose & Tom

@ THE Englewood Farmers Market

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Address:
Old Englewood Village
300 block of W. Dearborn St.
Englewood, FL 34223


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October thru May
Thrusdays 9am-2pm

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